Solar Energy In India: Step By Step Evolution Of Solar Energy In India

solar panel g1ae9e274e 1920

Earth is blessed with enormous energy, classified between conventional and nonconventional sources. Conventional energy sources are fast depleting, compelling the world to rely on sustainable renewable energy resources like solar energy and wind energy. Energy is an essential input for economic development and improving the quality of life, especially in the form of power. Therefore, every country in the world needs energy and has stored reserves of different forms of energy resources for its utilization.    Similarly, India, too, is blessed with several energy resources. However, India is dependent on other nations for specific natural resources that aren’t available in India and needs to be imported to fulfill India’s primary energy needs.  Currently, India imports over 80 percent of oil and 20 percent coal to meet its energy needs. This puts significant stress on the nation both economically and environmentally. This is why harnessing renewable energy seems to be one of the most promising sustainable ways to meet the increasing global electricity demands. Some of the best solar systems for home have the most significant energy potential among the other renewable energy sources, and the amount of energy that the earth receives can meet our planet’s current needs. To be precise, if we could use only 5% of this energy, it would be 50 times what our globe requires.   Where Does India Stand In This Scenario? India’s per capita energy consumption is meager as a developing country: one-fourth of China and one-tenth of the US. In our efforts to reduce emissions, we must ensure that the commoner’s primary and growing energy needs are met through clean but affordable sources. Geographically, India is an ideal country for solar energy. India gets 300 days of sunshine, with a seasonal peak in the summer, when solar energy is at its peak. India is targeting a considerable GDP surge, and, to achieve it, its energy demands are also expected to go up. Therefore, it is imperative to look for sustainable, abundantly available, cost-effective clean energy sources. Solar energy is such a source that not only helps combat climate change but can also reduce local pollution levels.  Step By Step Evolution Of Solar Energy In India India is around 1950’s used electricity generation mix consisting of Coal (steam), Oil and Hydro as significant sources. India had a total installed capacity of 2300 MW; by the end of 1955 and 1960, the total capacity had increased to 3420 MW and 5700 MW, respectively. Around the 1960s, India started discussing solar energy as a technology being developed over as a source of electricity generation. However, in the early 1970s, a significant thrust was laid upon Hydro, Tidal, and Geothermal sources of energy as a priority for research and   development in the country.  In the 1980s, India finally addressed solar energy and its implementation. Developing solar energy was of particular interest for meeting the energy demand of decentralized rural areas and potential industrial uses.  The Department of Non-Conventional Energy Sources (DNES) was formed on 6th September 1982 as a unit under the Ministry of Energy. Initially, solar cookers and were introduced to the masses through subsidies. During the 1980s, solar water heating systems were installed in industries like textile, dairy, bakery, brewery, etc. National Solar Photovoltaic Energy Demonstration Program (NASPAD) was implemented through Central Electronics Limited (CEL). The program intended to bring down the cost per Watt peak of modules by developing and demonstrating low-cost solar-grade silicon material and improving the efficiency of solar cells for electricity generation.  Manufacturing solar PV cells and modules were finally initiated on a large scale. Gradually, solar pumps for irrigation, drinking, and water supply purposes were also manufactured in India. The 1980s also saw a transformational development in the sector with the Amorphous Silicon Solar Cell (ASSC) technology’s new technology.  Further 1990s saw strategic planning to electrify 10,000 remotely located villages through decentralized and nonconventional methods of energy sources such as solar photovoltaic. This laid the foundation of intensification and enlargement of low-grade devices to meet the needs of cooking and heating in the country’s rural areas.  In the late 1990s, private players were encouraged to participate in the solar sector development to mobilize additional resources for the power sector, namely generation, transmission, and distribution.  Greater emphasis was laid on improving the reliability and quality of power. Particular emphasis was laid on the electrification of villages.  Post-2000, many developments were initiated in the field, with the help of some of the private best solar companies playing a considerable role in developing solar power in India. What we see today is a consequence of decades of efforts taken into developing solar power in India.  However, even today, there is a need to promote solar system to more and more regions and   take part in a sustainable world with solar energy playing a considerable role. 

0/5 (0 Reviews)

Like this article?

Related Posts